Mind Your P’s and Q’s: Top Manners You Should Model

children's national guild of courtesyAs a teacher, there are some behaviors I am more apt to tolerate than others. Fidgety? I understand, I’m the same way. Forgetful? That’s expected: we all have lots of things to remember. Unfinished assignments? As long as it isn’t an everyday ongoing occurrence, I can deal with. But bad manners? Impropriety of behavior is one thing I will not tolerate in my students. It’s a good thing I have only had three in my homeschool because ingraining proper manners and instilling sincere politeness in my boys has required consistent effort.

Because the most effective form of teaching manners is role modeling, teaching manners has required me to be on my best behavior,  especially when my boys were young. Little ones are always watching and they imitate what they see. Tutorials, books with colorful illustrations, acting, singing. it is good to combine all types of teaching techniques, but if you really want your children to be good mannered, be their example.

manners2 Manners1Manners don’t come naturally, so with a gentle and tender heart, teach them and show them.  Have your kids take a look at George Washington’s list of 110 virtues. remember my boys copying them by hand when they first learned to write,
emperorNumber 7 is a good one: Put not off your Cloths in the presence of Others, nor go out your Chamber half Dressed.

Number 55 not so much: Eat not in the Streets, nor in the House, out of Season.

No matter how full your school days are, don’t skimp on Manners 101. You can be sure the good manners you  instill in your children will serve them well throughout life.
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2 thoughts on “Mind Your P’s and Q’s: Top Manners You Should Model

  1. After years of gently nudging my boys at their friends homes to “remember to say thank you” or the every present, “what do you say to your friends?” comment after a play-date, I am happy to report that they learned to do it on their own without even a glance from me. Manners are a way of respecting others, but somewhere along the line, something got blurry and they were seen as antiquated repression. Thanks for the post and all the little reminders therein

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