The Importance of Testing

When you start to home school, if you are like most of us, testing can be a foreign word. The first question you are going to have to answer is what material to use to test the student or students. If you are teaching multiple grades it helps to test on the same day for each grade. There are books and help manuals to give you a point to start from. A popular one is “HOW DO YOU KNOW THEY KNOW WHAT THEY KNOW?” By Tares M. Moon. A good source for spelling curriculum is Christianbooks.com, or in their CBD Home School Catalog. Read more…

“Fightin’ words” for homeschoolers

Idiotic. Stupid. Uninformed.

Those are words that have been used by some readers to describe the News & Eagle’s recent editorial regarding home schooling.

The editorial itself seemed pretty innocuous. But many who are in the home schooling community took the editorial as an indictment of home schooling…

…The editorial called for the law to be changed at minimum to require parents to notify the state they are schooling their children at home. We also recommended that a curriculum be followed.

Well, those apparently are “fightin’ words” to some folks who are schooling their children at home. Read more…

Homeschool dads no longer content to sit on sidelines

CHICAGO — For Tim and Nicholas Peebles, school is always in session – even at the grocery store.

As the father and son stroll the aisles, Tim finds plenty of visual aids to teach 8-year-old Nicholas about subjects like health and nutrition, agriculture and economics.

No longer content to sit on the sidelines, fathers like Tim Peebles are getting more involved in what was once firmly a woman’s domain: homeschooling. Read more…

Bangkok Homeschools want more say in subjects

BANGKOK -Plans by the Education Ministry to regulate homeschooling have upset parents.

The ministry wants parents to draw on the curriculum for all subjects.

Parents say only a third of subjects should have to draw on the curriculum. They should be free to decide themselves on the rest. Read more…

Debate continues on home-school students

The Kaneland School Board has been left with the assignment of deciding whether a home-schooling policy should allow participation in Illinois High School Association sanctioned sports.

Kaneland administrators last April began developing a policy to “set a tone” of cooperation with families who request their child play high school sports, even though the student does not attend classes in a district school.

The district’s Citizens Advisory Committee last fall further deliberated the subject, with a majority recommending home schooled students not be allowed to participate in IHSA sports. Read more…

Black families explore home schooling

Seven years ago, Judith Thomas used to see only a few African-Americans at home schooling expos and conventions.

“Last spring, there were easily 25 to 30 — which is still pretty small, but a definite increase,” said the former Cobb County middle school teacher, who now is president of the Heritage Home School Support Group. Read more…

ND Committee rejects changes to testing homeschoolers

Legislators Wednesday rebuffed a Department of Public Instruction proposal to require students who are taught at home to take the same standardized tests as those in public schools.

Greg Gallagher, the state school improvement director, told the House Education Committee on Wednesday that the change would provide a comparison between home-schooled students and their peers in public schools. Read more…

Scientist: Out of the fold

When he was 12, Erik Demaine talked himself into Dalhousie University in his home town of Halifax, Nova Scotia, despite having no grades or academic record to speak of. Eight years and a PhD later, he became the youngest professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He specialises in computational origami – the geometry of paper folding. Steve Nadis spoke to him about the advantages and pitfalls of following such an unconventional route to the academic elite Read more…

College Basketball Diamond in the Rough

For Kevin Johnson, the transition to college could — perhaps should — have been more difficult than for the average incoming student-athlete.

Johnson, you see, never attended high school; the Tulsa senior was homeschooled from the fourth grade on.

His parents, Marshall (a running back for the old Baltimore Colts for four seasons in the 1970s) and Sherunda, were concerned about negative influences — read: drugs and violence — at schools in their Houston suburb, so they made the decision to personally educate all three of their sons. Read more…

But How Do I?

Have you ever reached a point in your homeschooling when you say to yourself “Gee, I’d really like Stephie to learn advanced quantum physics, but how do I even begin???”

Wow, how intimidating! And I don’t mean the quantum physics part either! For me it was the seemingly simple things, teaching piano (after fifteen years of lessons you’d think I’d have a clue), first grade math (since when did they start introducing basic algebra to six year olds anyhow?), the consonant blend “-ck” (“Yes, honey, I know there is a C, but trust me, it sounds like a K because it just does!”) Read more…

More students learning at home, state officials say

MARION, Ind. (AP) — The number of Indiana parents who teach their children at home has nearly tripled since 1998, increasing from 7,664 students to 21,091 last year.

And those are only the home-schooled students the state knows about. An exact count could be higher because many parents do not bother registering their students, officials said. Read more…

Muslims craft their own curriculum

Every morning, Fatima Saleem’s two children get up and go to school at the kitchen table in their Columbia, S.C., home.

In between math, social studies, and English, their mother – who doubles as their teacher – mixes in lessons in Arabic and Islamic studies.

The Saleem family is part of a small but growing number of American Muslims opting to teach their children at home. As do home schoolers of other faiths, Ms. Saleem says teaching her children herself ensures they absorb a strong religious identity. Read more…

Twelve Step Program for the Stressed-Out Homeschool Mom

Today, while talking in a chat room with Karen, she gave me the idea for this column. You see, Karen was having a bad day. It was the first day back to “school” with her boys and things were not going according to plan. The children were fighting, not really wanting to do their work, and Karen was having a difficult time dealing with it all. She ventured into a homeschool chat room hoping to get some help for her struggles.

My advice to Karen was to yell at her children to “KNOCKITOFF!” Read more…

Home is where the school is

Lunchtime at the Evans house is a break from the books just like any other building where learning takes place.

But as 6-year-old Micah stands on the kitchen counter, then leaps off to work the microwave, where he is cooking chicken nuggets, it becomes clear this classroom is a little different.

Amanda Evans, the mother and home schoolteacher for her three children, didn’t see Micah on the counter and probably would have scolded him for being there. But her hands are often full as she teaches her two sons and daughter the material they would be learning if they were in what they call regular school. Read more…

A Schedule-What is it?

When I started Kindergarten, I was required to attend school at a certain time and on certain days. This was a mandate from the state, since I attended a public learning institution…

This time schedule was considered normal and necessary to educate a large number of pupils in one class. I grew up thinking this was the only option available. Then I was introduced to home schooling and the possibilities became a wondrous source of creativity. I could now use time in new and inventive ways. Read more…

Budding artist draws on vast travel experience

She’s been around the world, spending time in exotic tropical places and studying art in some of the world’s most recognizable museums. She’s had her paintings displayed around the country. And, oh yeah, she’s only 10 years old. Read more…

Homeschooling in Ireland

Q. My wife and I may be moving from the U.S. to Dublin. We are interested in continuing to homeschool our daughter, who is now 7 years old. Are there any restrictions we should know about home education abroad? Read more…

Alternate schooling gets local boost

According to Guilford resident Ned Vare, the father of a homeschooled child, “dumbing down” is not just a catchy phrase.

“It’s the national education policy,” he said.

Vare and his spouse, Luz Shosie, are the parents of 23-year-old Cassidy, whose only education in a formal school setting was during nursery school. The couple explained that after spending some time in a school setting, Cassidy decided to quit, a decision they said made them “proud.”

A former schoolteacher, Shosie did not agree with what she was seeing inside a school setting.

“They were trying to teach kids to be good consumers…sit still, and do what they were told,” she said. “School wasn’t a good place for kids.” Read more…

Mom and dad are teacher and principal

It�s not the typical classroom.

Sure, maps of both the world and America are on the wall. A computer sits in the corner. The bookshelves in the room are full and a solar system chart hangs over the doorway.

But there are only four students in this school. Their mom is the teacher and their dad is the principal. The classroom stretches across a two-story home in Warren County. Read more…

Professionals say its hard to determine how effective home-schooling is.

Martine and Grace Chanslor have never seen the inside of a school – at least, not as students.

They’re among the increasing number of children who are home-schooled. Some parents, like the Chanslors, are home-schooling their children because they believe they can have a better education that way. Some do it for religious reasons.

Professional educators say they can’t keep up with the number of children being home-schooled, nor with the quality of education they are receiving. Read more…