Home-schoolers enjoy Christmas tea as lesson

GREENWELL SPRINGS — A Christmas tea at the home of Robin Wright and her 8-year-old daughter, Danielle, might have been a scene from Victorian England. Grandmothers, mothers and their home-schooled daughters dressed up in hats and gloves and brought their favorite holiday goodies.

Robin Wright is president of the Christian Home Educators Fellowship of Baton Rouge, an organization of 265 families who home-school their children. The tea was her idea. “As home-schoolers, we normally tend to do a lot of family activities anyway,” she said. Read more…

Parents press for change

Home-schoolers Kelly and Robin Criscuolo-DeButts would like to take a few classes at Spotsylvania High School.

But the two sisters live in one of the majority of school districts across Virginia that don’t allow home-schooled students to enroll part time or participate in extracurricular activities. Read more…

‘American Minute’ covers historical event each day of year

Beginning today, WorldNetDaily will feature daily throughout the year the “American Minute” � a brief account of a significant event in the history of the United States.

Best-selling author Bill Federer, president of publishing company Amerisearch Inc., compiles each day’s entry.

Wrote WND columnist Rebecca Hagelin, each “American Minute” “provides a succinct, invaluable lesson about American history that many of today’s popular textbooks ignore.” Read more…

Why do WE homeschool?

Meg asked me the other day why I thought homeschooling has become so popular. Millions of families, in every state of the USA, in perhaps every province in Canada, and in many other countries as well, have tried homeschooling in the past few decades. Some of these families have decided later to switch (back) to public or private schools, but many have continued to homeschool. Some families are in their second generation (or more) of learning at home, possibly the best endorsement that the concept could have.

Why has this happened? What has changed since the 1960’s when our parents sent us to school, believing that learning en masse was the best thing for us? Why have we decided that this belief is no longer true (if it ever was?) Well, I’ve got an opinion on that (as always), but I’d like to stress that this is MY opinion, and nobody else should be blamed for it, if you disagree. Read more…

Homeschool student to study ocean on team of famous scientist

When a world-famous scientist begins to explore the Channel Islands off California’s coast in January, a 15-year-old Naples boy will be diving at his side.

Aaron Golly is one of 28 middle-school students worldwide to be selected to assist in this year’s Jason Project…

Golly, a ninth-grader who is home-schooled by his parents, had to submit a video of himself explaining why he wanted to be an argonaut. He also had to write two essays. Read more…

The Moldrups never lack for something to do

With nine children, four jobs, and countless subordinates, it’s understandable that Riley County Police Lt. Kurt Moldrup has multiple number-one priorities and lifelong dreams…

“My wife is incredible,” Moldrup said. “She’s a hard-working, driven character. … She is the key to it all. We home school, so the kids are there all the time.”

At home, he said, they learn about character and faith as a way of insuring their academic success. The Read more…

Joy of home-schooling

Anthony Thamer, 11, was pure energy as he explained his hopes and dreams. “I’ve always been home-schooled, and I like it.” He methodically ticked off the benefits of this type of education on his fingers: “You get to stay home, you do your schoolwork and you don’t ever get bossed around by any other kids,” he said with a grin. His favorite subjects are spelling and English, and he is a devoted reader. Read more…

Strong rules for homeschooled athletes

The Maine Principals Association’s rules on home-schoolers may need some tinkering, but that doesn’t mean they’re wrong. The intent — to keep abuses out of Maine high school athletics — is important to the quality and fairness of play for all state athletes.

MPA rules prohibit home-schooled athletes from choosing to play for a private school. They must play for their local public school or not play at all.

Home-schooled students see this as an infringement of their right of choice. Read more…

Cyber schools fill a niche but opposition is mounting

Cyber charter schools, like the charter schools made of bricks and mortar, are government-funded and operate independent of most state and local education rules. The difference is that rather than trekking to another building, students at cyber charter schools stay at home and connect to their lessons and teachers through their computers.

Combining the flexibility of home schooling with the structure of public schools, the cyber charters are fast becoming a popular option for gifted and disabled students who need special attention. And increasingly, they are filling a market niche for parents who want to home-school their children but lack the expertise to teach or the money for materials, equipment and textbooks. Read more…

Livestock show teaches valuable life lessons

When Katie, Amy and Mary Lou McClendon hear other kids say they don’t have anything to do at home, they are confused.

The 14-, 11- and 10-year-old sisters spend about an hour each morning feeding, grooming and exercising their animals for the Nueces County Junior Livestock Show and Sale. Then they move on to a full day of schoolwork with occasional tests and home-school co-op class meetings. School is followed by violin classes, swim team practices and church activities. Read more…

Oklahoma Educator cites lack of oversight

TULSA — Educators say they can’t keep up with home-schooled children to determine whether they’re receiving a quality education.

In fact, school administrators don’t even know how many students are being kept out of public schools to learn at home.

“It is impossible for us to enforce school attendance laws, since we do not know who, in fact, is being home- schooled, nor to what degree,” Tulsa Superintendent David Sawyer said. Read more…

Merry Christmas!



Wishing you and your family many blessings on this Christmas day. Glory to the new-born king!

Faith transcends cancer

Green-needled garlands and miniature white lights hug the entrance railings of 10-year-old Esther Lodenkamp’s home amid the pines and wildlife of the Nicolet National Forest.

Esther, who likes to play with her older siblings when they pretend to be the von Trapps in scenes from “The Sound of Music,” is especially thankful for one thing this Christmas.

Her father. Read more…

Home sweet home

Most students rush around in the morning trying to make it to their classroom before the bells rings.

For high school junior Brandon Simpkins, 15, of Winslow Township, the school bell never rings, and the “classroom” where he learns is his dining room table. Brandon is one of more than 2 million students in the United States who are home schooled.

Parents home school their children for religious, academic, social and philosophical reasons, but Kathy Simpkins, Brandon’s mom, simply said she wanted to be the one to guide her six children through their education. Read more…

Put off by public schools, more Muslims home-teach

Ibrahim Imam, 9, starts his school day at 8:30 a.m. sharp. Like other fourth graders, he studies math, science, reading and cursive writing. He also practices Arabic and recites the Koran.

And, like a small but growing number of Muslim pupils nationwide, he learns each subject in his living room seated across a desk from his mother.

Seema Imam started home-schooling her son two years ago, after she decided that Ibrahim was doomed to the margins of public school life in Hickory Hills, Ill., and in danger of internalizing negative ideas about his religion. Read more…

There’s no place like home schooling

Janey Phillips, a home educator for 18 years, was doing some last-minute shopping in the mall when one of her sons wandered over to a showcase filled with what Phillips called “pretty things.” The boy, who had been reading Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew,” stared at the items and quoted the line, “rings and things and fine array …”

For homeschooled students, nearly everything is a lesson. Parents who homeschool say it’s a lifestyle that takes a big commitment, and they wouldn’t have it any other way.

“Kids get excited to hear references to things they’ve studied,” Phillips said. “Children learn best when they are interested in what they’re learning, not just fed facts.” Read more…

Home-schooling parents face questions over methods

California’s outgoing education chief is attempting to crack down on parents who home school their children on their own by exploiting a loophole in the state’s education code.

Under California law, students who do not attend public schools can only be educated three ways: by enrolling in a private school, learning at home from parents guided by a credentialed teacher, or being taught by a credentialed tutor.

Many home-schooling families, however, have found a way around those requirements. Knowing that private schools do not require their teachers to be credentialed, some parents have declared their homes to be private schools. Read more…

HSLDA Urges MPA to Reconsider Sports Policy

The Home School Legal Defense Association has written a letter to the Maine Prinicipals Association saying it would go to court to seek a preliminary injunction if the association does not reconsider its policy.

The Maine Principals’ Association is coming under fire from a national home-school rights advocacy group for banning home-schooled students from playing sports at private schools. Maine law allows home-schoolers to participate in academic and athletic activities at their local public school. A flap erupted last month after MPA Director Richard Durost sent a clarification letter to schools pointing out that home-schooled students may play on teams in MPA-sponsored sports only at their local schools, not private schools. Maine has about 4,400 home-schooled students. Read more…

Love: What Christmas is all about

Six years ago, Jay and Lisa Ward took a step that changed their lives forever. They adopted a family of five brothers from Russia. And with that one decision, they brought into their lives more love and happiness than they could have ever imagined. “Everyone, all our friends and family members thought we were crazy,” said Jay. “But, it didn’t take us long to make up our minds. We were going to adopt those five boys. Even though everyone was shocked, they’ve been very supportive.” Read more…

Court rules against parents in home-schooling case

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) – The Nebraska Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that a former Scotts Bluff County couple was remiss in schooling their children at home.

The couple, identified only as “Tim and Rhonda T.,” failed to meet state standards in schooling five of their eight children at home, the court ruled. Read more…